John Anthony

Designed by: Linehouse
For client: Maximal Concepts Floor area: 750.00 M² Year of completion: 2018
Submitted for: Restaurant of the Year

Linehouse John Anthony 14 Hi
© Photographer Jonathan Leijonhufvud, Linehouse and John Anthony shares the copyright of these images.

An intimate room behind the bar welcomes guests to be seated on floral booth seats, allowing glimpses of the bartenders beyond. Cream linen curtains hang on a copper rail, dividing each booth and billowing hand dyed indigo linen envelops the ceiling recal

About the Project

John Anthony embarked on a voyage from east to west arriving in the London docklands where he became the father of Chinatown. The design of the restaurant is an interpretation of his journey, exploring architectural styles between east and west, creating a British tea-hall turned Chinese canteen.

Arriving guests enter down a vertical staircase of white metal and backlit diffused glass. The entrance captures a glimpse of what is to come: terracotta render walls with a triple height arched ceiling clad in pink tiles, and lime green terrazzo floor. Infinite reflections of the arches are captured in high level mirrors.

The main dining hall in the restaurant recalls dockland storehouses. The modern vaulted space plays on verticality and lightness, with a sense of whimsy in circular canopy columns in dusty pink lacquer.

Together with Maximal Concepts, Linehouse plays on the retro nostalgia of the Chinese canteen, fusing this with colonial detailing captured in details of the timber bar with glass vitrines, wicker leaners and furniture, and gold and maroon floral fabrics. Tubes of gin hang above the bar, infused with blends of botanicals found along the Spice Routes.

At high level the arches are back lit with diffused glass, allowing for shifting light qualities. This arched structure hovers above the bar. A white metal structure hangs from the render ceiling reminiscent of an industrial storehouse, suspending custom timber tube lights.

What’s unique about it

Our challenge on this project was telling and interpreting the story of an historical figure in an unexpected, impactful, and spatial way. We wished to create a series of spaces that diners would not have experienced before, capturing whimsy and fun.

Key to the project was the integration of sustainable materials to align with Maximal Concept’s eco-friendly and ethical practices at the heart of this restaurant concept. It was also important that each material explored an element of John Anthony’s journey.

We imagine that John Anthony would have come from a humble and hardworking background so materials like hand dyed Indigo fabric from Lantau Island in Hong Kong, the hand applied terracotta render and old terracotta flooring tiles reclaimed from old houses in rural China would have been familiar to him. We pay homage to the goods that would have been transported such as spices, exotic animals and opium via the medium of illustration on hand-painted tiles in the private dining rooms and on custom patterned laminate surfaces in the bathrooms. The architecture of the vaulted ceilings represent his new workplace of the east end docklands.

The space is highly detailed, with bespoke lighting and furniture, allowing guests to experience the space over and over in different ways.

It was our client Maximal Concept’s ambition to create one of Hong Kong’s first sustainable restaurant venues to encourage awareness and discussion.

Linehouse John Anthony 04 Hi
© Jonathan Leijonhufvud

The second reception encountered on arrival at the main dining and bar space.

Linehouse John Anthony 06 Hi
© Photographer Jonathan Leijonhufvud, Linehouse and John Anthony shares the copyright of these images.

At high level the arches are back lit with diffused glass, allowing for shifting light qualities throughout the day and night. This arched structure hovers above the bar displaying an expansive gin collection behind glass vitrines.

Linehouse John Anthony 05 Hi
© Jonathan Leijonhufvud

A series of arched spaces allow for intimate dining. The arches are clad in handmade tiles in green and blue, framing views of the kitchen and the spaces beyond.

Linehouse John Anthony 16 Hi
© Photographer Jonathan Leijonhufvud, Linehouse and John Anthony shares the copyright of these images.

The private dining rooms are lined in hand-painted tiles featuring large scale illustrations of commodities traded between the British and Chinese in the 18th century such as medicinal poppies and exotic animals.

Linehouse John Anthony 02 Hi
© Jonathan Leijonhufvud

Arriving guests enter down a vertical staircase of white metal and backlit diffused glass. Infinite reflections of the arches are captured in the high level mirrors.

Linehouse John Anthony 11 Hi
© Photographer Jonathan Leijonhufvud, Linehouse and John Anthony shares the copyright of these images.

Reclaimed terracotta tiles pave the main dining hall, sourced from abandoned houses in rural China.

Linehouse John Anthony 06 Hi
© Photographer Jonathan Leijonhufvud, Linehouse and John Anthony shares the copyright of these images.

The main dining hall in the restaurant recalls dockland storehouses. The modern vaulted space plays on verticality and lightness, with a sense of whimsy in circular canopy columns in dusty pink lacquer. Linehouse plays on the retro nostalgia of the Ch

Linehouse John Anthony 18 Hi
© Photographer Jonathan Leijonhufvud, Linehouse and John Anthony shares the copyright of these images.

The bathrooms reference the spice trade, with a custom laminate in green, mustard, and turquoise framing the space, custom copper mounted vanities, and a green arched ceiling.

Linehouse John Anthony 1 A Hi Hero
© Jonathan Leijonhufvud

The entry to the restaurant offers a glimpse of what is to come: terracotta render walls with a triple height arched ceiling clad in pink tiles, and lime green speckled terrazzo floor.

Credits:
Linehouse

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