Nominee

SHANGHAI PALACE CINEMA

Designed by: PULSE ON PARTNERSHIP LIMITED
For client: BROADWAY CINEMA CHINA LTD Floor area: 5638.00 M² Year of completion: 2018
Submitted for:

About the Project

No matter what type of movies - comedy, science fiction, romance, horror or war - you’d need to have a story before producing a breathtaking movie. These stories are portrayed as a storyboard to illustrate the composition of each scene of the film, which is a crucial step during the filmmaking process. The designers use ‘square’ to convey this storyboard concept for this design. Squares can be presented in many different shapes and forms - they can be assembled neatly to form an orderly pattern, or create unique forms by various overlapping methods. Not only this, these ‘square’ shapes also remind people of the traditional filmmaking technique using roll films to capture the images of actions frames by frames. The designers have successfully constructed a rare cinema interior space using squares. One can immediately spot the theme of this cinema design at the entrance lobby - on the ceiling hangs gigantic brass-toned iron frames that are subdivided into a number of small rectangles. These hollow iron frames are being hung at various height levels, which makes the space of the ceiling more three-dimensional. The design concept continues to the auditorium - from the colour schemes to the rectangular forms decorating the whole perimeter. Horizontal and vertical lines interspersed on the wall randomly, creating various sizes of rectangles which bring an interesting focal point to this otherwise gigantic blank canvas.

What’s unique about it

The story of a movie is portrayed as a storyboard to illustrate the composition of each scene of the film, which is a crucial step during the filmmaking process. The designers use ‘square’ to convey this storyboard concept for this design. Squares may sound very simple, yet the designers showed us how creative the presentation can be - the gigantic brass-toned iron frames that are subdivided into a number of small rectangles at the entrance lobby, square patterns used on the walls and floors and the custom-made desks and chairs that are being assembled by many white square shapes. Not only this, these ‘square’ shapes also remind people of the traditional filmmaking technique using roll films to capture the images of actions frames by frames. When the light shines through the iron frames in the lobby, it projects overlapping rectangular shadows on the ground. It is the designers’ contemporary approach towards interpreting the roll film concept.

Are you sure?

Remember that you can only vote once per award category.